Accessibility

SFPIRG has a commitment to making all our spaces and events as inclusive as we possibly can. This is an ongoing learning process. Some of the ways we do this now are:

  • All our events are free and open to everyone.
  • All SFPIRG spaces and venues where we hold events are wheelchair and scooter accessible with access to accessible and gender-inclusive washrooms nearby.
  • We aim to create scent-reduced spaces for all our events, and we ask people to refrain from wearing scented products and perfumes.
  • The SFPIRG lounge and office are scent-free and nut-free spaces.
  • If you need money for public transit or dependent care in order to attend one of our events, this is available upon request. The intention of this is that no one experiences hardship in order to attend any of our events.
  • ASL interpretation is booked for many of our events. Please note registration deadlines for requesting ASL interpretation.
  • If you need other accommodations in order to attend an SFPIRG event, like large-print handouts, please get in touch.

Please contact us at admin@sfpirg.ca or (778) 782-5339 for more info or to request a subsidy.

 

SFPIRG Accessibility Audit:

This audit of the SFPIRG lounge and office was performed on July 20, 2012 by the Radical Access Mapping Project (RAMP).

From RAMP’s website:

“So what’s an accessibility audit? Why are we doing this?

Disability Justice focused accessibility auditing is about collectively creating useful, accurate, broad-based and up-to-date accessibility information about the physical environment so we can make informed choices about what events and spaces we participate in and support. The Radical Access Mapping Project began in 2009 out of frustration over the lack of useful (or often any) accessibility information in our communities. Auditing spaces is just one piece among many working towards disability justice, with an anti-oppression, intersectional, radical access approach: one that looks at & beyond ramps.

Since accessibility is not just about structural access for folks with specific kinds of limited mobility, in this audit you’ll find a wide range of information which you may not find in a traditional accessibility audit. Audits will vary depending on the needs and perspectives of the communities and spaces in question. The RAMP is made up of a very small team of volunteers, and the invaluable input and direction of a wide range of folks with various access needs makes this is a real collaborative effort. Your voice and experience are central!”

You can learn more about RAMP, find other audits, and get more general accessibility content by visiting the Radical Access Mapping Project website!